My Newsvine Article, too lazy to rewrite it for the site today.

There’s a certain entertainment value to having a condition lime FM, there are so many symptoms and syndromes involved with it that you never know what’s going to hit from one day to the next. One thing you can count on is the fibrofog. Fibrofog is a hard thing to describe, especially when you have a head full of it when you’re doing the describing, so I’ll let the functioning brains at fibromyalgia-symptoms.org do it for me

What is Fibrofog?

Fibrofog is a term given to the variety of cognitive problems that many fibromyalgia sufferers face during their illness. Fibrofog encompasses memory loss, difficulties using language, and difficulties with learning. These symptoms tend to descend in a haze or “fog,” around the sufferer. Fibrofogs can occur at any time and can vary in intensity when they do occur. Fibrofogs tend to be at their most severe during flare ups in pain.

It too manifests itself in many ways, typical for me is the fun house floor effect, you get out of bed and as soon as your legs take up your bodyweight some wise ass pulls the floor out from under you. The trick is to make sure that you rise slowly and try and keep yourself poised so that if the combination of vertigo and the confusion rampant in your head does pull a surprise attack you land back in bed. I have about a 90% success rate on that score, this morning was a subset of the remaining 10%, where you land on the sleeping dog and make him thing the house just collapsed. But, that’s a problem for later, when you get yourself vertical and moving you can bribe him to forgiveness from the goodie box downstairs.

This will not be a long article, quite frankly it too me two hours to write this much, but I do so with a purpose. As always there is good news to be found on a Wednesday. In this case its Tim’s Tips for Dealing with Fibrofog.

  • IMPORTANT SAFETY TIP: Do not drive!  If you’re in a full-blown fog you couldn’t pass a field sobriety test to save your life so you obviously have no reason to get behind the wheel!  This is a tough one if you work, before I retired I had to get a ride to work, but there’s a reason I’m retired now. 😉
  • Your thinking center is not at 100% so quit trying to do things at normal speed, be the tortoise because you as a hare will spend a lot of time wondering “How the hell did I do that?”
  • Spellcheck!  Its amazing the words that appear when I know for a fact I’m typing something else. I’ve had some of my best writing ideas on days I was socked in by the fog, typed out a whole paragraph and had not one recognizable word when I tried to read back through it.
  • KEEP YOUR SENSE OF HUMOR
  • REMEMBER: This will pass, it might take a few minutes, a few hours or a day or two but all things with FM are cyclic.

The Good News for this Wednesday?

I’m not writing about finding something to call good news on a Wednesday with a major attack of IBS. 😉

And the best news on this good news Wednesday?

If you have this, you’re not alone, there are a lot of people that have the same problems as you do, but at least you know what’s wrong with you, thousands have no idea what’s wrong with them and doctors that are equally clueless.

Those of us that know what’s wrong have the potential do a lot of good by talking about it, which goes against the psychology of FM that makes you feel guilty that you can’t do everything that you feel you should, and the worry that if you talk about what’s wrong with you people will roll their eyes and write you off as a whiner. A friend of mine sent me a good phrase to answer people like that: “My chronic disabling illness is more real than your imaginary medical degree.”

The fog also makes you ramble, so on that note, Happy Wednesday!

© 2009, Tim Boothby. All rights reserved.

I was born in the Midwest and grew up in Iowa, Missouri and Texas. I guess you could say I had an eventful childhood, at least it was a helluva lotta fun! I enlisted in the Air Force in 1984 and retired in 2007. I saw a whole bunch of the world and racked up a lot of experiences in the process. Now I'm retired and enjoying life to the fullest!